A comparison of the consensus and clinical definitions of pancreatitis with a proposal to redefine post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis

Everson L.A. Artifon, Adrienne Chu, Martin Freeman, Paulo Sakai, Ashar Usmani, Atul Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: We evaluated the correlation between the consensus and clinical definitions of pancreatitis following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), with the objective of updating and revising the definition of post-ERCP pancreatitis (Pep). Methods: Three hundred patients were subjected to serial serum amylase & lipase levels testing and abdominal computed tomography scan for abdominal pain after ERCP. Main outcome measures included the correlation between consensus and clinical definitions. Results: Using consensus criteria, 25 patients had acute pancreatitis (11 of mild and 14 of moderate severity). Forty-three patients had acute pancreatitis using the clinical definitions (18 of mild and 25 of moderate severity). At 4 hours, serum hyperamylasemia of under 1.5-fold and at 12 hours a serum hyperamylasemia of under 2-fold had a negative predictive value of 0.94 for development of PEP. Serum hyperamylasemia following ERCP had a poor positive predictive value for Pep. Conclusions: Clinical and consensus definitions are poorly correlated; use of the latter leads to significant underrecognition of PEP. The adoption of clinical definition results in uniformity of diagnosis of pancreatitis for clinical care and research. Serum amylase levels at 4 and 12 hours after ERCP have a high negative predictive value for PEP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)530-535
Number of pages6
JournalPancreas
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

Keywords

  • Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography
  • Post-ERCP pancreatitis

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A comparison of the consensus and clinical definitions of pancreatitis with a proposal to redefine post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this