A Descriptive Study of Intimate Partner Violence and Child Maltreatment: Implications for Child Welfare Policy

Lynette M. Renner, Kristen Shook Slack, Lawrence M. Berger

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Using survey and administrative data, this chapter presents analyses of cooccurring intimate partner violence (IPV) and child maltreatment allegations in a sample of current and former welfare recipients (N = 1,011). Results show a co-occurrence rate of six percent within an approximate one-year time interval. In the subgroup of families with co-occurring IPV and child maltreatment allegations (n = 65), sixty-eight percent of investigated maltreatment reports involve the female IPV victim as a perpetrator. Findings also show that multiple forms of IPV and child maltreatment should be considered when assessing co-occurrence. Compared to families that experience one or neither form of family violence, families with both IPV and child maltreatment allegations have higher levels of parental depression and stress, greater use of harsh discipline, lower parental warmth, and poorer parental physical health. Results from this study are relevant to systems that serve families experiencing IPV and child maltreatment, and for interventions designed to improve family safety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationChild Welfare Research
Subtitle of host publicationAdvances for Practice and Policy
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199863648
ISBN (Print)9780195304961
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Keywords

  • Child abuse
  • Child maltreatment
  • Co-occurring violence
  • Family violence
  • Intimate partner violence

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