A draft genome of field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense) provides tools for the domestication of a new winter biofuel crop

Kevin M. Dorn, Johnathon D. Fankhauser, Donald L. Wyse, M. David Marks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) is being domesticated as a new winter cover crop and biofuel species for the Midwestern United States that can be double-cropped between corn and soybeans. A genome sequence will enable the use of new technologies to make improvements in pennycress. To generate a draft genome, a hybrid sequencing approach was used to generate 47 Gb of DNA sequencing reads from both the Illumina and PacBio platforms. These reads were used to assemble 6,768 genomic scaffolds. The draft genome was annotated using the MAKER pipeline, which identified 27,390 predicted protein-coding genes, with almost all of these predicted peptides having significant sequence similarity to Arabidopsis proteins. A comprehensive analysis of pennycress gene homologues involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis, metabolism, and transport pathways revealed high sequence conservation compared with other Brassicaceae species, and helps validate the assembly of the pennycress gene space in this draft genome. Additional comparative genomic analyses indicate that the knowledge gained from years of basic Brassicaceae research will serve as a powerful tool for identifying gene targets whose manipulation can be predicted to result in improvements for pennycress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-131
Number of pages11
JournalDNA Research
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

Keywords

  • Thlaspi arvense
  • comparative genomics
  • de novo assembly
  • field pennycress
  • whole genome sequencing

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