A global standard for monitoring coastal wetland vulnerability to accelerated sea-level rise

Edward L. Webb, Daniel A. Friess, Ken W. Krauss, Donald R. Cahoon, Glenn R. Guntenspergen, Jacob Phelps

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

128 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sea-level rise threatens coastal salt-marshes and mangrove forests around the world, and a key determinant of coastal wetland vulnerability is whether its surface elevation can keep pace with rising sea level. Globally, a large data gap exists because wetland surface and shallow subsurface processes remain unaccounted for by traditional vulnerability assessments using tide gauges. Moreover, those processes vary substantially across wetlands, so modelling platforms require relevant local data. The low-cost, simple, high-precision rod surface-elevation table-marker horizon (RSET-MH) method fills this critical data gap, can be paired with spatial data sets and modelling and is financially and technically accessible to every country with coastal wetlands. Yet, RSET deployment has been limited to a few regions and purposes. A coordinated expansion of monitoring efforts, including development of regional networks that could support data sharing and collaboration, is crucial to adequately inform coastal climate change adaptation policy at several scales.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)458-465
Number of pages8
JournalNature Climate Change
Volume3
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
E.L.W. and D.A.F. were supported by the Singapore-Delft Water Alliance, grants R303-001-001-272 and R303-001-024-414. E.L.W. was supported by Ministry of Education, Government of Singapore grant R-154-000-400-133. D.A.F. was supported by Ministry of Education, Government of Singapore grant R-109-000-141-133. K.W.K., D.R.C., and G.R.G. were supported by the USGS Climate and Land Use Change R&D Program. The Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University and the South African Environmental Observation Network provided South African RSET data points. C. Lovelock provided the location of the RSET site in Indonesia. Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the US Government.

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