A linear inversion approach to measuring the composition and directionality of the seismic noise field

Patrick M. Meyers, Tanner Prestegard, Vuk Mandic, Victor C. Tsai, Daniel C. Bowden, Andrew Matas, Gary Pavlis, Ross Caton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We develop a linear inversion technique for measuring the modal composition and directionality of ambient seismic noise. The technique draws from similar techniques used in astrophysics and gravitational-wave physics, and relies on measuring cross-correlations between different seismometer channels in a seismometer array. We characterize the sensitivity and the angular resolution of this technique using a series of simulations and real-world tests. We then apply the technique to data acquired by the three-dimensional seismometer array at the Homestake mine in Lead, SD, to estimate the composition and directionality of the seismic noise at microseism frequencies. We show that, at times of low-microseism amplitudes, noise is dominated by body waves (P and S), while at high-microseism times, the noise is dominated by surface Rayleigh waves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3097
JournalRemote Sensing
Volume13
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by National Science Foundation INSPIRE grant PHY1344265. Parts of this research were conducted by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav), through project number CE170100004.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • Array processing
  • Beamforming
  • Inversion
  • Microseism

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