A pilot study of the feasibility of long-term human bone balance during perimenopause using a 41Ca tracer

S. K. Hui, J. Prior, Z. Gelbart, R. R. Johnson, B. C. Lentle, M. Paul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The mechanisms governing calcium fluxes during bone remodeling processes in perimenopausal women are poorly known. Despite higher, albeit erratic, estradiol levels in perimenopause, spine bone loss is greater than during the first five years past the final menstrual flow when estradiol becomes low. Understanding changes during this dynamic transition are important to prevent fragility fractures in midlife and older women. The exploration of long-lived 41Ca (T1/2 = 1.04 × 105 yrs) tracer measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) leads to the possibility of monitoring bone remodeling balance. With this new technology, we explored a pilot long-term feasibility study of bone health by measuring the 41Ca trace element in urine for six years from premenopausal to later perimenopausal phases in one midlife woman. We measured bone mineral density in parallel.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)796-800
Number of pages5
JournalNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms
Volume259
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007

Keywords

  • Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)
  • BMD
  • Ca tracer
  • Osteoporosis
  • Perimenopause

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A pilot study of the feasibility of long-term human bone balance during perimenopause using a <sup>41</sup>Ca tracer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this