A user interface for encoding space usage rules expressed in natural language

Pavel Samsonov, Johannes Schöning, Brent Hecht

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Our interactions with the spaces around us are frequently defined by space usage rules (SURs) like "no smoking", "no dogs allowed", and "stay on the trail". These rules are important public health tools and help protect the environment, among other applications. However, despite their importance, no large-scale database of SURs currently exists. This prevents online/mobile maps from presenting these rules to users, as their traditional paper counterparts have been shown to do regularly. The lack of a SUR database also prevents developers from building novel SUR-based applications, e.g. mobile apps that inform users where they can smoke or walk their dog. In this paper, we present an in-development user interface to support the semi-automatic encoding of SURs expressed in natural language in documents such as laws, city ordinances, park rules, and institution FAQ pages. Our system will allow an untrained user to easily enter complex rules into a spatial data format compatible with OpenStreetMap.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCHI 2015 - Extended Abstracts Publication of the 33rd Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Subtitle of host publicationCrossings
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages2211-2216
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781450331463
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 18 2015
Event33rd Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2015 - Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: Apr 18 2015Apr 23 2015

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
Volume18

Other

Other33rd Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2015
CountryKorea, Republic of
CitySeoul
Period4/18/154/23/15

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A user interface for encoding space usage rules expressed in natural language'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this