Abuse in Childhood or Adolescence and Gestational Diabetes: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Susan M. Mason, Deirdre K. Tobias, Cari J. Clark, Cuilin Zhang, Frank B. Hu, Janet W. Rich-Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction Early life abuse has been linked to later Type 2 diabetes, but its association with gestational diabetes has not been examined. The aim of this study was to examine the association between childhood and adolescent abuse victimization and risk of gestational diabetes in the Nurses' Health Study II. Methods Participants were asked about experiences of physical and sexual abuse in childhood or adolescence in 2001 and about history of pregnancy complications in 2009. Mothers of singleton live births who provided information on their abuse history comprised the study sample. Modified Poisson regression was used to estimate risk ratios and 95% CIs for gestational diabetes as a function of physical and sexual abuse victimization. Analyses were conducted in 2014-2015. Results Of 45,550 women in the analysis, 8% reported severe physical abuse and 11% reported forced sexual activity in childhood or adolescence. Approximately 3% (n=3,181) of pregnancies were complicated by gestational diabetes. In adjusted models, severe physical abuse was associated with a 42% greater gestational diabetes risk (risk ratio=1.42, 95% CI=1.21, 1.66) relative to no physical abuse. Forced sexual activity was associated with a 30% greater risk (95% CI=1.14, 1.49). Women with histories of both physical and sexual abuse were at higher risk than women exposed to a single type of abuse. These associations were not explained by overweight status in early adulthood or prior to pregnancy. Conclusions Childhood and adolescent victimization is associated with increased risk of gestational diabetes in adult women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)436-444
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican journal of preventive medicine
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Dr. Mason’s time is supported by the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health Grant (K12HD055887) from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the Office of Research on Women’s Health, and the National Institute on Aging, NIH, administered by the University of Minnesota Deborah E. Powell Center for Women’s Health. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the office views of the NICHD or NIH. Dr. Clark is supported by grant R03HD068045 from NICHD. Additional support was provided by grant RO1HL081557 from NIH. Nurses’ Health Study II infrastructure is supported by grant UM1CA176726 from NIH.

Funding Information:
Dr. Mason’s time is supported by the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health Grant (K12HD055887) from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the Office of Research on Women’s Health, and the National Institute on Aging, NIH, administered by the University of Minnesota Deborah E. Powell Center for Women’s Health. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the office views of the NICHD or NIH. Dr. Clark is supported by grant R03HD068045 from NICHD. Additional support was provided by grant RO1HL081557 from NIH. Nurses’ Health Study II infrastructure is supported by grant UM1CA176726 from NIH.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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