Adaptive thermal detectors using electrostatically controlled thermal conductance

W. B. Song, Joseph J Talghader

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

When thermal infrared detectors are exposed to large signals, they are susceptible to a host of unwanted effects including intensity dependent noise and detectivity, nonlinearities in materials characteristics, and even temporary blindness or device damage. To combat these problems and to extend dynamic range, the responsivity and time constant of microbolometers have been controlled using electrostatic actuation. The responsivity has been demonstrated to switch over a factor of 60, with theoretical limits encompassing 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. High responsivity states correspond to free-standing bolometers, while discrete lower responsivity states are created by partially or completely actuating the device supports into contact with the substrate. Continuous tuning over a part of the range is demonstrated by utilizing electrostatic pressure to increase the thermal contact between discrete switching states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2002 IEEE/LEOS International Conference on Optical MEMs, OMEMS 2002 - Conference Digest
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages31-32
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)0780375955, 9780780375956
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
EventIEEE/LEOS International Conference on Optical MEMs, OMEMS 2002 - Lugano, Switzerland
Duration: Aug 20 2002Aug 23 2002

Publication series

Name2002 IEEE/LEOS International Conference on Optical MEMs, OMEMS 2002 - Conference Digest

Other

OtherIEEE/LEOS International Conference on Optical MEMs, OMEMS 2002
CountrySwitzerland
CityLugano
Period8/20/028/23/02

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