Adult day service use and reductions in caregiving hours: Effects on stress and psychological well-being for dementia caregivers

Joseph E. Gaugler, Shannon E. Jarrott, Steven H. Zarit, Mary Ann Parris Stephens, Aloen Townsend, Rick Greene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

81 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The objective of this study was to determine whether adult day service use interacts with decreases in primary caregiving hours (i.e. the time caregivers spent on activities of daily living/instrumental activities of daily living, memory problems, and behavior problems for patients) to alleviate caregiver stress and negative mental health over time. Methods: Three-month longitudinal data from the Adult Day Care Collaborative Study (n = 400) were used. Results: Decreases in memory problem hours among adult day service users were associated with reduced feelings of role overload; decreases in ADL hours among non-users were associated with decreases in worry and strain over a three-month period. Conclusion: The findings suggest that adult day services are potentially effective in restructuring caregiving time and providing respite to family members.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-62
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

Keywords

  • Adult day care
  • Adult day services
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Caregiving
  • Community-based care
  • Family caregiving
  • Informal caregiving
  • Respite

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