Allometric scaling laws linking biomass and rooting depth vary across ontogeny and functional groups in tropical dry forest lianas and trees

Chris M. Smith-Martin, Xiangtao Xu, David Medvigy, Stefan A. Schnitzer, Jennifer S. Powers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

There are two theories about how allocation of metabolic products occurs. The allometric biomass partitioning theory (APT) suggests that all plants follow common allometric scaling rules. The optimal partitioning theory (OPT) predicts that plants allocate more biomass to the organ capturing the most limiting resource. Whole-plant harvests of mature and juvenile tropical deciduous trees, evergreen trees, and lianas and model simulations were used to address the following knowledge gaps: (1) Do mature lianas comply with the APT scaling laws or do they invest less biomass in stems compared to trees? (2) Do juveniles follow the same allocation patterns as mature individuals? (3) Is either leaf phenology or life form a predictor of rooting depth? It was found that: (1) mature lianas followed the same allometric scaling laws as trees; (2) juveniles and mature individuals do not follow the same allocation patterns; and (3) mature lianas had shallowest coarse roots and evergreen trees had the deepest. It was demonstrated that: (1) mature lianas invested proportionally similar biomass to stems as trees and not less, as expected; (2) lianas were not deeper-rooted than trees as had been previously proposed; and (3) evergreen trees had the deepest roots, which is necessary to maintain canopy during simulated dry seasons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)714-726
Number of pages13
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume226
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank NSF CAREER Grant Division of Environmental Biology 1053237 (to JSP) and US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program under award number DESC0014363 (to JSP), and the University of Minnesota Natural History Award from the Dayton Bell Museum Fund (to CMSM) for funding. We thank Milena Gutierrez L for logistical support at Estación Experimetal Forestal Horizontes, and Damaris Pereira, David Pereira, Mario Blandon, Pedro Alvarado, Jose Antonio, Tatiana Pereira, Maria José Gomez and José Guevara for excellent help in the field and the laboratory. We also thank Daniel Pérez for helping with the species identification and Justin Touchon for statistical advice, and Jeannine Cavender‐Bares, Rebecca Montgomery and Walid Sadok for helpful comments on previous drafts.

Funding Information:
We thank NSF CAREER Grant Division of Environmental Biology 1053237 (to JSP) and US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program under award number DESC0014363 (to JSP), and the University of Minnesota Natural History Award from the Dayton Bell Museum Fund (to CMSM) for funding. We thank Milena Gutierrez L for logistical support at Estaci?n Experimetal Forestal Horizontes, and Damaris Pereira, David Pereira, Mario Blandon, Pedro Alvarado, Jose Antonio, Tatiana Pereira, Maria Jos? Gomez and Jos? Guevara for excellent help in the field and the laboratory. We also thank Daniel P?rez for helping with the species identification and Justin Touchon for statistical advice, and Jeannine Cavender-Bares, Rebecca Montgomery and Walid Sadok for helpful comments on previous drafts.

Keywords

  • biomass partitioning
  • deciduous trees
  • evergreen trees
  • lianas
  • maximum rooting depth
  • simulation modeling
  • tropical dry forests
  • whole-plant harvest

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Allometric scaling laws linking biomass and rooting depth vary across ontogeny and functional groups in tropical dry forest lianas and trees'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this