Ambulatory blood pressure after acute exercise in older men with essential hypertension

Nadine S. Taylor-Tolbert, Donald R. Dengel, Michael D. Brown, Steve D. McCole, Richard E. Pratley, Robert E. Ferrell, James M. Hagberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

We sought to determine whether reductions in blood pressure in hypertensives after acute exercise persist for more than the 2 to 3 h found in controlled laboratory settings. Subjects (n = 11) were obese (32 ± 4% body fat), sedentary (VO2max 27 ± 4 mL/kg/min) 60 ± 6-year-old men with stage 1 or 2 essential hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure was recorded on 1 day preceded by 45 min of 70% VO2max treadmill exercise and on another day not preceded by exercise. Systolic blood pressure was lower by 6 to 13 mm Hg for the first 16 h after exercise (P < .05) compared to the day without prior exercise. Twenty-four-hour, day, and night average systolic blood pressures were significantly lower on the day after exercise. There was a trend for peak systolic blood pressure to be lower during the entire 24 h and the day portion of the recording; peak systolic blood pressure was significantly lower during the night portion of the recording after exercise. Systolic blood pressure load (percent of systolic blood pressure readings >140 mm Hg) was reduced during the entire 24 h and the day portion of the recording after exercise. Diastolic blood pressure was lower for 12 of the first 16 h after acute exercise (hours 0 to 4, 5 to 8, 13 to 16) (P < .05) compared to the day without prior exercise. Twenty-four-hour, day, and night average diastolic blood pressure was also significantly lower on the recording after exercise. Peak diastolic blood pressure was lower over the entire 24-h period. Diastolic blood pressure load (percent of diastolic blood pressure readings >90 mm Hg) was lower during the entire 24 h and the day portion of the day after exercise. Preliminary data also suggest that common genetic polymorphisms at the angiotensinogen, lipoprotein lipase, and angiotensin converting enzyme loci may affect the blood pressure-lowering response after acute exercise. Thus, in sedentary, obese hypertensive men a single aerobic exercise session reduced blood pressure enough to result in significantly lower 24-h average systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure. This could result in a reduced cardiovascular load during the 24 h after acute exercise in older hypertensive men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-51
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of hypertension
Volume13
Issue number1 II SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Blood pressure load
  • Genetic markers

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