An analysis of American Journal of Epidemiology citations with special reference to statistics and social science

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Abstract

In an effort to inform the ongoing discussion about the purpose, purview, theoretical orientation, and viability of epidemiology, this paper considers the contemporary epistemological foundations of the discipline by analyzing article citations. Two principal questions are the following: 1) What research do American Journal of Epidemiology (AJE) authors rely on to support, inform, and frame their investigations? and 2) to what extent do such authors use social scientific and statistical citations? The data used appear to be superior to those used in previous efforts because they contain complete citations for all articles published, along with complete within-article citations, for all AJE articles published from January 1981 to December 2002. The most frequent AJE citations are statistically oriented works. About 9% of citations are to AJE articles, 15% are to a larger set of eight epidemiologic journals, 15% are to a select set of eight medical journals, 3% are to (bio)statistics journals, and just 0.2% are to social science journals. Trend analysis reveals little change during the 22-year study period. The principal implication is that AJE authors are overlooking a vast literature that could inform their understanding of how exposures emerge and are maintained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)494-500
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of epidemiology
Volume161
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
American Journal of Epidemiology Journal of the American Medical Association New England Journal of Medicine Lancet Journal of the National Cancer Institute Journal of Clinical Epidemiology British Medical Journal American Journal of Public Health American Journal of Clinical Nutrition International Journal of Epidemiology Circulation International Journal of Cancer Cancer Annals of Internal Medicine Journal of Infectious Disease American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology British Journal of Cancer Cancer Research Biometrics Epidemiology Pediatrics Journal of the American Statistical Association Archives of Internal Medicine Statistics in Medicine Statistical Methods in Medical Research

Funding Information:
American Journal of Epidemiology Journal of Clinical Epidemiology* International Journal of Epidemiology Epidemiology Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Annals of Epidemiology Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention Epidemiologic Reviews Total Medicine Journal of the American Medical Association New England Journal of Medicine Lancet Journal of the National Cancer Institute British Medical Journal Cancer Annals of Internal Medicine Archives of Internal Medicine Total Statistics Biometrics Journal of the American Statistical Association Statistics in Medicine Statistical Methods in Medical Research Journal of the Royal Statistical Society (A-D) Biometrika American Statistician International Statistical Review Total Social science Demography American Sociological Review Population Studies American Journal of Sociology Sociological Methods & Research Social Forces Social Problems American Economic Review American Anthropologist Journal of Political Economy Total All other citations

Keywords

  • History
  • Knowledge

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