An application of Roger's innovation model: Use of the internet to purchase apparel, food, and home furnishing products by small community consumers

Kim K.P. Johnson, Sharron J. Lennon, Cynthia Jasper, Mary Lynn Damhorst, Hilda Buckley Lakner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of our research was to assess beliefs of small community consumers regarding use of the Internet for product acquisition. We applied a portion of Rogers's (1995) innovation diffusion model where he hypothesizes characteristics of an innovation (e.g., complexity, trialability) that facilitate or impede adoption. In addition, we were interested in whether these characteristics differed between small community purchasers and non-purchasers of innovations. Usable questionnaires were returned by 2,198 small community consumers. Data were analyzed using multivariate and univariate analyses of variance. Small community consumers who purchased through the Internet were more likely than non-purchasers to perceive Internet shopping as being relatively advantageous; more compatible with their values, beliefs, needs and past experiences; less complex; more trialable; and more observable. Furthermore, small community consumers who were purchasers using the Internet perceived Internet shopping as less risky than did non-purchasers. The results were parallel across the three product categories of food, apparel, and home furnishing products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-196
Number of pages12
JournalClothing and Textiles Research Journal
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

Keywords

  • Apparel
  • Food
  • Home furnishings
  • Innovation
  • Internet
  • Small community consumers

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