An epidemiologic study of carpal tunnel syndrome and hand-arm vibration syndrome in relation to vibration exposure

Ray F. Miller, William H. Lohman, George Maldonado, Jack S. Mandel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

No Minnesota workers' compensation claims have been filed for permanent partial disability benefits with a diagnosis of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). A cross-sectional study was undertaken to evaluate 519 compensation claimants following carpal tunnel surgery. Workers with significant vibration exposure and symptoms compatible with HAVS were identified within the group. The results show that some workers are not diagnosed as having HAVS even though they meet the diagnostic criteria. This suggests that HAVS should be considered in the differential diagnosis when a worker presents with neural and/or vascular symptoms of the hands and fingers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-105
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Hand Surgery
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1994

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
From the Iowa Medical Clinic. PC, Cedar Rapids, IA. Occupational Medicine Residency Program. St. Paul-Ramsey Medical Center. St. Paul, MN, and Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. MN. Supported by grant #8008. The Ramsey Foundation, St. Paul. MN. Received for publication Oct. 29. 1992: accepted in revised form July 28. 1993. No benefits in any form have been received or will be received from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article. Reprint requests: Ray F. Miller, MD, MPH, Iowa Medical Clinic. PC, 600 Seventh Street SE. Cedar Rapids, IA 52401.

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