An investigation of the gender differences in creative thinking abilities among 8th and 11th grade students

William M. Bart, Brad Hokanson, Iclal Sahin, Mohammed Abdelhady Abdelsamea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the gender differences in creative thinking subtests between males and females among 8th and 11th grade students. A suburban independent public school district in Minnesota provided student responses to the Torrance Creative Thinking Test (TTCT) Figural Form A. The sample included 996 8th and 748 11th grades students. One-way ANOVAs were used to analyze the differences between males and females in the two study samples. Results of the study revealed that there were statistically significant differences on the majority of the subtests between males and females in favor of the females among both the 8th and 11th grade students. However, there were no statistically significant differences in the fluency subtest between males and females among the 8th grade students. The results also revealed that there were no statistically significant differences in the fluency and originality subtests between males and females among the 11th grade students. Educational implications and suggestions for future work were presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-24
Number of pages8
JournalThinking Skills and Creativity
Volume17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported in part by a grant from the Metropolitan Research Grant Program of the University Metropolitan Consortium and the University of Minnesota Center for Urban and Regional Affairs . The authors express thanks to the School District personnel, who helped in the implementation of the research and in the collection of the data.

Funding Information:
This study was part of a larger study of creativity among school-aged students, and was funded within the University of Minnesota. The funded larger study was intended to shed light on the incidence and development of creativity in school districts. Although we have other data such as SES and achievement scores of the students, we decided not to include them in this manuscript, primarily because we wanted to focus on the gender differences for creativity as indicated among the participating students in the participating school district. We do consider grade as a factor in the study to determine the extent to which gender differences for creativity for 8th grade students are similar to gender differences for creativity for 11th grade students.

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Creative thinking
  • Gender differences
  • Late childhood

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'An investigation of the gender differences in creative thinking abilities among 8th and 11th grade students'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this