An unexpected outcome of surface engineering an integral membrane protein: Improved crystallization of cytochrome ba3 from Thermus thermophilus

Bin Liu, V. Mitch Luna, Ying Chen, C. David Stout, James A. Fee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Past work has shown that it is feasible to mutate surface residues of soluble proteins and to a lesser extent membrane proteins in order to improve their crystallization behavior. Described here is a successful application of this approach to the integral membrane protein Thermus thermophilus cytochrome ba 3 oxidase. Two mutant forms of this enzyme (I-K258R and I-K258R/II-E4Q) were created in which symmetrical crystal contacts within crystals of wild-type enzyme were modified. These mutant proteins had greatly shortened crystallization times, decreasing from ∼30 d for the wild type to 1-3 d for the mutants, and crystallization was highly reproducible. Native-like proteins crystallize in space group P43212, whereas the mutant proteins crystallize in space group P41212 with a different packing arrangement. Crystals of the P43212 form occasionally diffracted to 2.4-2.3 Å resolution following controlled dehydration, while those of the P41212 form routinely diffracted to between 3.0 and 2.6 Å for crystals that had been cryoprotected but not dehydrated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1029-1034
Number of pages6
JournalActa Crystallographica Section F: Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications
Volume63
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 30 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cytochrome ba
  • Cytochrome c oxidase
  • Integral membrane proteins
  • Surface engineering
  • Thermus thermophilus

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'An unexpected outcome of surface engineering an integral membrane protein: Improved crystallization of cytochrome ba<sub>3</sub> from Thermus thermophilus'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this