Analgesic responses following adrenal demedullation and peripheral catecholamine depletion

Richard J. Bodnar, Nansie S. Sharpless, Jeffrey H. Kordower, Michael Potegal, Gordon A. Barr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adrenalectomy affects analgesic responses differentially, potentiating morphine and cold-water swim analgesia while reducing prolonged, intermittent foot shock analgesia. Adrenocortical influences also exhibit differential effects: dexamethasone pretreatment potentiates morphine analgesia while reducing both forms of stress-induced analgesia. In assessing sympathomedullary influences in analgesic processes, adrenal demedullation reduces prolonged, intermittent foot shock analgesia. The present study examined the effects of adrenal demedullation both with (MADX/6-OHDA) and without (MADX) peripheral 6-hydroxydopamine injections upon the analgesic responses following 2°C and 15°C swims and following 5 mg/kg and 2.5 mg/kg doses of morphine. Significant reductions were observed in adrenal epinephrine levels in all MADX rats and in heart norepinephrine levels in MADX/6-OHDA rats. Despite the adrenal demedullation and sympathetic dennervation, neither the MADX group nor the MADX/6-OHDA group differed significantly from sham control rats in their baseline post-operative or post-injection flinch-jump thresholds, in their analgesic responses following the 2°C and 15°C swims, or in their analgesic responses following the 5 mg/kg and 2.5 mg/kg morphine doses. These data are assessed in terms of divergent adrenal influences upon various analgesic responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1105-1109
Number of pages5
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1982

Keywords

  • 6-Hydroxydopamine
  • Adrenal demedullation
  • Adrenocortical response
  • Morphine analgesia
  • Stress-induced analgesia
  • Sympathomedullary response

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