Anatomic repair of anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery by aortic reimplantation: Early survival, patterns of ventricular recovery and late outcome

Anthony Azakie, Jennifer L. Russell, Brian W. McCrindle, Glen S. Van Arsdell, Lee N. Benson, John G. Coles, William G. Williams

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83 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. To determine the early and late outcomes of patients presenting with anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery who had repair by aortic reimplantation. Methods. From January 1952 to July 2000, 67 patients presented with anomalous coronary artery from the pulmonary artery. Forty-seven patients who had repairs performed by aortic reimplantation are the subject of this study. The median age at repair was 7.7 months. Before repair, 10 infants (21%) presented in extremis requiring ventilatory and inotropic support, and 38 infants (80%) presented in heart failure. Autologous pericardial hood coronary arterioplasty was used in 4 patients, and concomitant mitral valve repair was used in 1 patient. Results. Hospital survival was 92%. Five children required postoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for a median of 4 days (range, 2 to 8 days). Patients who had extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were significantly more likely to have presented in critical condition (40% vs 3% if no extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; p = 0.006) or with ventricular arrhythmias (67% vs 7%; p = 0.027), to have presented with significantly lower preoperative repair median ejection fraction (10%, n = 5 vs 40%, n = 38; p = 0.01) or to have presented with more severe left ventricular dilatation (p = 0.03). Within a 15-year or less follow-up (mean, 4.7 years) there were no late deaths. Kaplan-Meier survival was 91% at 5 years, and freedom from reoperation was 93% at 10 years. At late follow-up, echocardiography demonstrated significant improvements in mean ejection fraction (64% ± 9% vs 33% ± 21% preoperatively, p < 0.0001); moderate mitral regurgitation (9% vs 38% Preoperatively, p < 0.02); and wall motion abnormalities (15% vs 81% preoperatively, p < 0.002). The ratio of measured left ventricular end-diastolic dimension to the 95th percentile of normal declined from 1.4 ± 0.3 to 1.0 ± 0.1 (p < 0.0006). Children who had extracorporeal membrane oxygenation had normal ejection fractions and ventricular dimensions at follow-up (n = 3). Repeated measures of mixed linear regression analysis demonstrated that normalization of ejection fraction and left ventricular function occurred within 1 year of repair. Improvements in mitral regurgitation lagged behind normalization of ejection fraction and left ventricular dilatation. Conclusions. Anatomic repair of anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery by aortic reimplantation yields excellent early survival and late functional outcomes even in critically ill infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1535-1541
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume75
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003

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