Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior to healthy eating behaviors in urban Native American youth

Stefanie A. Fila, Chery Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

111 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: To investigate the efficacy of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to predict healthy eating behavior in a group of urban Native American youth. Methods: Native American boys and girls (n = 139), ages 9-18 years old, were given a self-administered survey to assess eating behavior using the TBP constructs (intention, attitude, subjective norm, barriers, self-efficacy, and perceived behavioral control). Youth were also measured for height and weight and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Bivariate correlations and stepwise regression analyses of TBP model were performed with SPSS software. Results: No association was found between intention and healthy eating behavior. However, independently healthy eating behavior was correlated with barriers (0.46), attitude (0.44), perceived behavioral control (0.35), and subjective norm (0.34). The most predictive barriers to eating healthy included the availability and taste of foods. Boys' eating behavior was most predicted by subjective norm, while girls' eating behavior was most predicted by barriers. Conclusion: Lack of association between intention and healthy eating behavior suggests that factors other than intentions may drive healthy eating behaviors in urban Native American youth. Results indicate that programs promoting healthy eating to youth might focus on collaborating with families to make healthy foods more appealing to youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number11
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 30 2006

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