Are Young Adolescents' Social and Emotional Skills Protective Against Involvement in Violence and Bullying Behaviors?

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21 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined relationships between social-emotional skills and involvement in bullying and violence among young adolescents from ethnically diverse, economically disadvantaged urban neighborhoods. Data were from 171 sixth- and seventh-grade students involved in a larger intervention study. Analyses examined relationships between social-emotional skills measures (intrapersonal skills, stress management skills, interpersonal skills) and involvement in violence, physical bullying, and relational aggression. Of social-emotional skills indicators, interpersonal skills and stress management skills demonstrated significant bivariate relationships with each of the bullying and violence outcomes. In multivariate models, greater interpersonal skills and greater stress management skills were significantly associated with lower odds of violence involvement. Greater stress management skills were also significantly associated with lower levels of physical bullying and relational aggression. Findings suggest that efforts to foster development of young adolescents' social-emotional skills may, in turn, reduce their risk for involvement in bullying and violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-606
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Promotion Practice
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2013

Keywords

  • behavior change
  • child/adolescent health
  • mental health
  • violence prevention

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