Association of abdominal muscle composition with prediabetes and diabetes: The CARDIA study

Andrea Granados, Achamyeleh Gebremariam, Samuel S. Gidding, James G. Terry, John Jeffrey Carr, Lyn M Steffen, David R Jacobs Jr, Joyce M. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the relationship of abdominal muscle lean tissue and adipose tissue volumes with prediabetes and diabetes. Research Design and Methods: We measured abdominal muscle composition in 3170 participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who underwent computed tomography (CT) at Year 25 of follow-up (ages, 43-55 years). Multinomial regression analysis was used to evaluate the associations of CT-measured intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), lean muscle tissue (lean) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volumes with diabetes at any point during the CARDIA study, newly detected prediabetes, prior history of prediabetes, and normal glucose tolerance. Models were adjusted for potential confounding factors: age, sex, race, height, smoking status, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, cardiorespiratory fitness and study centre. Results: Higher IMAT, lean and VAT volumes were all separately associated with a higher prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes. Inclusion of VAT volume in models with both IMAT volume and lean volume attenuated the association of IMAT with both prediabetes and diabetes, but higher lean volume retained its association with prediabetes and diabetes. Individuals in the highest IMAT quartile, coupled with VAT in its lower three quartiles, had a higher prevalence of diabetes, but not of prediabetes, than those with both IMAT and VAT in their respective lower three quartiles. Adjusting for cardiorespiratory fitness did not substantially change the findings. Conclusion: Higher IMAT volume was associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes even after adjustment for VAT volume. However, further study is warranted to understand the complicated relationship between abdominal muscle and adipose tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-275
Number of pages9
JournalDiabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors thank the principal investigators, staff, and participants of the CARDIA study for their contributions. The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study is supported by contracts HHSN268201800003I, HHSN268201800004I, HHSN268201800005I, HHSN268201800006I and HHSN268201800007I from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging (NIA), and an intraagency agreement between NIA and NHLBI (AG0005).

Funding Information:
The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study is supported by contracts HHSN268201800003I, HHSN268201800004I, HHSN268201800005I, HHSN268201800006I and HHSN268201800007I from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging (NIA), and an intra-agency agreement between NIA and NHLBI (AG0005). This manuscript has been reviewed by members of the CARDIA group for scientific content. D.J is supported by The Young Adult Longitudinal Trends in Antioxidants (YALTA). The YALTA study is supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health (R01 HL 53560). A. G. was supported by the Institutional T32 grant 5T32DK071212 during fellowship training.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Keywords

  • body composition
  • glycaemic control
  • type 2 diabetes

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