Associations between cerebrospinal fluid total phosphatidylcholines, neurodegeneration, cognitive decline, and risk of mild cognitive impairment in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging

Danni Li, Clinton Hagen, Hai H. Bui, David Knopman, Clifford R. Jack, Mary Machulda, Ronald C. Petersen, Michelle M. Mielke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is unclear whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) phosphatidylcholines (PCs) are associated with neuroimaging measures of amyloid deposition and neurodegeneration (glucose metabolism, cortical thickness, and hippocampal volume), cognitive decline, or risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among cognitively unimpaired older adults. This study investigated the associations of 19 individual CSF PC concentrations and their total sum with cross-sectional and longitudinal measures of amyloid deposition and neurodegeneration, global and domain-specific cognitive z-scores, and risk of MCI among 655 cognitively unimpaired participants, mean age of 71 years, enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. Neither the CSF total PC concentration nor individual CSF PCs were cross-sectionally or longitudinally associated with neuroimaging measures, cognition, or risk of MCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52-54
Number of pages3
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume93
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Drs Li and Machulda receive funding from the National Institutes of Health. Dr Petersen receives consultant fees from Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc, Merck, Inc, Biogen, Inc, and Eisai, Inc; is on a Data Safety Monitoring Board for Genentech, Inc; and conducts presentation for GE Healthcare. Dr Jack serves on an independent data monitoring board for Roche and has consulted for Eisai, but he receives no personal compensation from any commercial entity. He receives research support from National Institutes of Health and the Alexander Family Alzheimer’s Disease Research Professorship of the Mayo Clinic. Dr Knopman serves on a Data Safety Monitoring Board for the DIAN study; is an investigator in clinical trials sponsored by Biogen, Lilly Pharmaceuticals, and the University of Southern California; and receives research support from the National Institutes of Health. Dr Mielke served as a consultant to Eli Lilly. She receives research support from the National Institutes of Health and unrestricted research grants from Biogen and Lundbeck. The remaining authors reported no disclosure.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health, United States grants U01 AG006786 , R01 AG011378 , R01 AG049704 , and RF1 AG55151 , the GHR Foundation, United States , and was made possible by the Rochester Epidemiology Project ( R01 AG034676 ). Dr Li receives research support from the Alzheimer’s Association (NIRG-15-362393) and National Institutes of Health, United States (R21 AG059068 and R01 AG059654). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • Cerebrospinal fluid
  • Cognition
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Phosphatidylcholines

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