Associations between HDL-cholesterol and polymorphisms in hepatic lipase and lipoprotein lipase genes are modified by dietary fat intake in African American and White adults

Jennifer A. Nettleton, Lyn M. Steffen, Christie M. Ballantyne, Eric Boerwinkle, Aaron R. Folsom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Polymorphisms in genes involved in HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism influence plasma HDL-C concentrations. We examined whether dietary fat intake modified relations between HDL-C and polymorphisms in hepatic lipase (LIPC-514C → T), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP TaqIB), and lipoprotein lipase (LPL S447X) genes. Diet (food frequency questionnaire), plasma lipids, and LIPC, CETP, and LPL genotypes were assessed in ∼12,000 White and African American adults. In both races and all genotypes studied, minor allele homozygotes had highest HDL-C concentrations compared to the other genotypes (P < 0.001). However, main effects were modified by usual dietary fat intake. In African Americans - women somewhat more strongly than men - LIPC TT homozygotes with fat intake ≥33.2% of energy had ∼3-4 mg/dL higher HDL-C concentrations than CC and CT genotypes. In contrast, when fat intake was <33.2% of energy, TT homozygotes had HDL-C concentrations ∼3.5 mg/dL greater than those with the CC genotype but not different from those with the CT genotype (Pinteraction = 0.013). In Whites, LPL GG homozygotes had greatest HDL-C at lower total, saturated, and monounsaturated fat intakes but lowest HDL-C at higher intakes of these fats (Pinteraction ≤ 0.002). Dietary fat did not modify associations between CETP and HDL-C. In conclusion, these data show that plasma HDL-C differs according to LIPC, LPL, and CETP genotypes. In the case of LIPC and LPL, data suggest dietary fat modifies these relations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e131-e140
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume194
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study is carried out as a collaborative study supported by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute contracts N01-HC-55015, N01-HC-55016, N01-HC-55018, N01-HC-55019, N01-HC-55020, N01-HC-55021, and N01-HC-55022. The authors thank the staff and participants of the ARIC study for their important contributions.

Keywords

  • Cholesteryl ester transfer protein
  • Dietary fat
  • HDL-C
  • Hepatic lipase
  • Lipoprotein lipase

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