At issue: Genes, experience, and chance in schizophrenia - Positioning for the 21st century

Steven O. Moldin, Irving I. Gottesman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

104 Scopus citations

Abstract

Genetic factors make important contributions to the etiologies of schizophrenia. The mode of familial inheritance remains unknown, but it is highly likely that multiple genes and idiosyncratic environmental factors are involved. Rapidly evolving genetic technologies have been applied in the genetic analysis of schizophrenia, and several genomic regions have been posited as harboring susceptibility genes. Currently, the strongest evidence implicates chromosomes 6 and 8, but these linkages are not yet confirmed. In this article we discuss genetic risk factors, gene-environment interaction, the feasibility of genetic testing, psychiatric genetic counseling, and the dangers of genetic discrimination as they apply to schizophrenia. We also address and correct specific misconceptions about the genetics of schizophrenia held by many in the scientific community and in the media, and discuss a blueprint for future genetic research and informed dissemination of findings to the public and to lawmakers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)547-561
Number of pages15
JournalSchizophrenia bulletin
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

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