Bacterial chemotaxis: A classic example of multiscale modeling in biology

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Both individual-based models and PDE models have been developed to describe the active movement of cell populations in various contexts. Individual-based models can faithfully replicate the detailed mechanisms of cell signaling and movement but are computationally intensive. PDE models are amenable for fast computation and mathematical analysis but are often based on phenomenological descriptions of macroscopic cell fluxes. Multiscale methods must be developed to elucidate the connections between individual-based models and PDE models in order to combine the strengths of these approaches. This chapter summarizes recent progress in connecting individual-based models and PDE models for chemotaxis of bacterial populations, which is a classic example for multiscale modeling in biology. The application scope and limitations of the Keller-Segel chemotaxis equation are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationModeling and Simulation in Science, Engineering and Technology
PublisherSpringer Basel
Pages143-167
Number of pages25
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameModeling and Simulation in Science, Engineering and Technology
ISSN (Print)2164-3679
ISSN (Electronic)2164-3725

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgements I would like to thank Professor Hans Othmer and Professor Radek Erban for past collaboration and discussion on the described research. I also thank my student Clinton Durney for proofreading this chapter. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under grant No. DMS-1312966 and NSF CAREER Award 1553637.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

Copyright:
Copyright 2018 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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