Behavioral engagement level, variability, and diurnal rhythm as a function of bright light in bipolar II seasonal affective disorder: An exploratory study

Steven S. Krauss, Richard A. Depue, Paul A. Arbisi, Michele Spoont

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Six patients with bipolar II seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and seven normal control subjects rated their moods in winter at six fixed times each week-day during 1 week of dim and 2 weeks of bright light. The scales rated represent the mood dimension specifically associated with depression, a dimension here called behavioral engagement (BE). Compared with controls, depressed SAD subjects (1) showed lower BE levels across all rating times of the day, (2 ) were more likely to show diurnal variation in BE, (3) displayed more between-day instability in BE diurnal rhythm, and (4) exhibited greater short-term lability (change within 3 hours) in BE. Bright light reduced or eliminated all group differences in BE level and variability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-160
Number of pages14
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1992

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgments. The research reported was supported by National Institute of Mental Health Research grant MH-37195 to Dr. Depue. The authors thank Rachel Muir for her technical assistance.

Keywords

  • Depression
  • mood variability
  • phototherapy

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