Bidirectional associations of accelerometer measured sedentary behavior and physical activity with knee pain, stiffness, and physical function: The CARDIA study

Kara M. Whitaker, Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Deepika Laddu, Daniel K. White, Stephen Sidney, Barbara Sternfeld, Cora E. Lewis, David R. Jacobs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objective was to examine bidirectional associations of accelerometer estimated sedentary time and physical activity with reported knee symptoms. Participants were 2,034 adults (mean age 45.3 ± 3.6 years, 58.7% female) from CARDIA. Generalized estimating equations for logistic regression and linear mixed regression models examined associations of accelerometer estimated sedentary time, light-intensity physical activity (LPA), and moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) at baseline (2005–06) with knee discomfort, pain, stiffness, and physical function (yes/no and continuous scores from short-form WOMAC function scale) at the 5- and 10-year follow-up exams. Linear regression models examined associations between knee symptoms at the 5-year follow-up with accelerometer estimates at the 10-year follow-up. Models were adjusted for confounders; individuals with comorbidities were excluded in sensitivity analyses. A 30 min/day increment in sedentary time at baseline was associated with lower odds of knee symptoms at the 5- and 10-year follow-up (OR: 0.95, 95% CI range: 0.92–0.98), while LPA and MVPA were associated with greater odds of knee symptoms (LPA OR range: 1.04–1.05, 95% CI range: 1.01–1.09; MVPA OR range: 1.17–1.19, 95% CI range: 1.06–1.32). Report of knee symptoms at the 5-year follow-up was associated with 13.52–17.51 (95% CI range: −29.90, −0.56) fewer minutes/day of sedentary time and 14.58–17.51 (95% CI range: 2.48, 29.38) more minutes/day of LPA at the 10-year follow-up, compared to those reporting no symptoms. Many associations were no longer statistically significant when excluding individuals with comorbidities. Findings support a bidirectional association of accelerometer estimated sedentary time and physical activity with knee symptoms across midlife.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101348
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume22
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA) is conducted and supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) in collaboration with the University of Alabama at Birmingham (HHSN268201800005I & HHSN268201800007I), Northwestern University (HHSN268201800003I), University of Minnesota (HHSN268201800006I), and Kaiser Foundation Research Institute (HHSN268201800004I). Accelerometer data collection was supported by grants R01 HL078972 and R56 HL125423 from the NHLBI. DRL is supported by grant K01HL148503 from the NHLBI. This manuscript has been reviewed by CARDIA for scientific content.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Author(s)

Keywords

  • Functional limitations
  • Knee pain
  • Knee stiffness
  • Light-intensity physical activity
  • Moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity
  • Sedentary behavior

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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