Bilingual advantage in executive control when task demands are considered

Li Qu, Joel Jia Wei Low, Ting Zhang, Hong Li, Philip David Zelazo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

To examine how task demands influence bilingual advantage in executive control over monolinguals, we tested 32 Chinese monolinguals and 32 Chinese-English bilinguals with four versions of a color-shape switching task. During switching trials, the task required participants to suppress one set of conflicting (or non-conflicting) responses and simultaneously to activate another set of conflicting (or non-conflicting) responses. The results showed that compared to monolinguals, (i) when suppressing conflicting responses or (ii) activating non-conflicting responses, bilinguals had significantly smaller switching costs though similar mixing costs; (iii) when suppressing one set of conflicting responses and simultaneously activating another set of conflicting responses, bilinguals had significantly smaller switching costs though larger mixing costs; and (iv) when suppressing one set of non-conflicting responses and simultaneously activating another set of non-conflicting responses, bilinguals had similar switching costs and mixing costs. These findings indicate that task demands affect bilingual advantage in executive control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-293
Number of pages17
JournalBilingualism
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • Bilingual
  • executive control
  • inhibition
  • task demand
  • task switching

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Bilingual advantage in executive control when task demands are considered'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this