Bioconversion of the nutrients in dairy manure for L-lactic acid production by Rhizopus Oryzae

Wanying Yao, Xiao Wu, Jun Zhu, Curt Miller, Bo Sun

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Six levels of crude protein (0.21 to 3.36 g/L) were investigated as the nitrogen source for production of L-lactic acid by Rhizopus oryzae with respect to the influence on L-lactic acid yield, biomass and mycelia morphology. Increases in crude protein from 0.21 to 1.68 g/L led to an increase in L-lactic acid concentration from 6.48 to 57.7 g/L. However, further increases beyond 1.68 g/L did not present continuing increases in L-lactic acid yields. Fresh dairy manure was employed as a base substrate to produce L-lactic acid. The parameters, including glucose, dairy manure, spore culture time and etc, were first examined using Plackett-Burman design to select the most important ones. In the optimization stage, a factorial design (24) was carried out for the most important components. The main effects were summarized by a polynomial regression equation to describe the L-lactic acid production. The optimum medium composition was 3 g L-1 nitrogen, 120 g L-1 glucose, 1.3 g L-1 KH2PO4, and 0.5 g L-1 MgSO4, and the L-lactic acid yield was 29.1% (measured) and 30.76% (predicted), based on the experimental conditions used in this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2010, ASABE 2010
PublisherAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
Pages1079-1090
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9781617388354
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Publication series

NameAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2010, ASABE 2010
Volume2

Keywords

  • Dairy manure
  • Economic medium
  • L-lactic acid
  • Nitrogen source

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