Brief Report: Willingness to Accept HIV-Infected and Increased Infectious Risk Donor Organs Among Transplant Candidates Living With HIV

Shanti M. Seaman, Sarah E. Van Pilsum Rasmussen, Anh Q. Nguyen, Samantha E. Halpern, Susan You, Madeleine M. Waldram, Saad K. Anjum, Mary Grace Bowring, Abimereki D. Muzaale, Darin B. Ostrander, Diane Brown, Allan B. Massie, Aaron A.R. Tobian, Macey L. Henderson, Faith E. Fletcher, Burke Smith, Ada Chao, Nishita Gorupati, Katya Prakash, Saima AslamDong H. Lee, Varvara Kirchner, Timothy L. Pruett, Ghady Haidar, Kailey Hughes, Maricar Malinis, Sonya Trinh, Dorry L. Segev, Jeremy Sugarman, Christine M. Durand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: HIV-infected (HIV+) donor to HIV+ recipient (HIV D+/R+) transplantation might improve access to transplantation for people living with HIV. However, it remains unknown whether transplant candidates living with HIV will accept the currently unknown risks of HIV D+/R+ transplantation. METHODS: We surveyed transplant candidates living with HIV from 9 US transplant centers regarding willingness to accept HIV+ donor organs. RESULTS: Among 116 participants, the median age was 55 years, 68% were men, and 78% were African American. Most were willing to accept HIV+ living donor organs (87%), HIV+ deceased donor organs (84%), and increased infectious risk donor organs (70%). Some (30%) were concerned about HIV superinfection; even among these respondents, 71% were willing to accept an HIV D+ organ. Respondents from centers that had already performed a transplant under an HIV D+/R+ transplantation research protocol were more willing to accept HIV+ deceased donor organs (89% vs. 71%, P = 0.04). Respondents who chose not to enroll in an HIV D+/R+ transplantation research protocol were less likely to believe that HIV D+/R+ transplantation was safe (45% vs. 77%, P = 0.02), and that HIV D+ organs would work similar to HIV D- organs (55% vs. 77%, P = 0.04), but more likely to believe they would receive an infection other than HIV from an HIV D+ organ (64% vs. 13%, P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Willingness to accept HIV D+ organs among transplant candidates living with HIV does not seem to be a major barrier to HIV D+/R+ transplantation and may increase with growing HIV D+/R+ transplantation experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-92
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2020

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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