Cancer survivors exercise at higher intensity in outdoor settings: The GECCOS trial

Jonathan M. Miller, Karim T. Sadak, Arman A. Shahriar, Natalie J. Wilson, Maree Hampton, Manami Bhattacharya, Ali Towle, Lucie M. Turcotte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: : This randomized cross-over group pilot trial assessed feasibility of recruiting survivors from a long-term follow-up clinic to an exercise group and measured whether outdoor or indoor exercise sessions better supported exercise motivation and behaviors in survivors of cancer. Methods: : Sixteen adolescent and young adult survivors of any cancer completed indoor and outdoor exercise sessions in this randomized cross-over pilot trial. Measures of physical activity, motivation, and fatigue were taken 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after indoor sessions and 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after outdoor sessions. Measures of physical activity and fatigue were also taken during each exercise session. Results: : Initial recruiting of 19 participants met recruiting goals. Survivors who attended the most sessions lived an average of 8.7 km closer to the clinic. Objectively measured physical activity intensity was 0.63 metabolic equivalents of a task (METs) per minute greater during outdoor exercise sessions as compared to indoor exercise sessions. There were no meaningful differences in long term, habitual physical activity behavior, motivation, or fatigue in the weeks following the outdoor exercise sessions as compared to the indoor exercise sessions. Conclusions: : This study shows the feasibility of recruiting survivors from a long-term follow-up clinic to community-based exercise groups. Although this brief pilot intervention did not show significant effects on habitual physical activity behavior or motivation in adolescent and young adult survivors of cancer, the greater exercise intensity during the outdoor exercise sessions indicate that holding group exercise sessions for survivors outdoors may promote greater intensity during exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere28850
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume68
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors thank Diego Luke and Alex Peters for serving as peer leaders for the exercise groups. Thanks to Allie Rykken and Andy Harris for serving as guides during the outdoor exercise sessions. Thanks to Kelly Wrinkle for coordinating logistics for the exercise sessions. This study was supported by grant #201 from the Center for Healthy Eating and Activity across the Lifespan (HEAL Center) at the University of Minnesota and by Children's Cancer Research Fund through a donation from Sheri Sobrato. Jonathan Miller and Manami Bhattacharya are supported by grant T32CA163184 from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) (PI: Michele Allen). This study was registered on Clinicaltrials.gov as study NCT03852758. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the HEAL Center, CCRF, Sherri Sobrato, NCI, or the National Institutes of Health. The funding agencies had no involvement in the study design; collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; writing of the report; or decision to submit the article for publication. The data that support the findings of this study are available on request from the corresponding author.

Funding Information:
The authors thank Diego Luke and Alex Peters for serving as peer leaders for the exercise groups. Thanks to Allie Rykken and Andy Harris for serving as guides during the outdoor exercise sessions. Thanks to Kelly Wrinkle for coordinating logistics for the exercise sessions. This study was supported by grant #201 from the Center for Healthy Eating and Activity across the Lifespan (HEAL Center) at the University of Minnesota and by Children's Cancer Research Fund through a donation from Sheri Sobrato. Jonathan Miller and Manami Bhattacharya are supported by grant T32CA163184 from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) (PI: Michele Allen). This study was registered on Clinicaltrials.gov as study NCT03852758. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the HEAL Center, CCRF, Sherri Sobrato, NCI, or the National Institutes of Health. The funding agencies had no involvement in the study design; collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; writing of the report; or decision to submit the article for publication. The data that support the findings of this study are available on request from the corresponding author.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC

Keywords

  • accelerometer
  • adolescent and young adult cancer survivors
  • cross-over trial
  • green exercise

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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