Changes in cochlear electrical stimulation induced Fos expression in the rat inferior colliculus following deafness

Shigeyo Nagase, Josef M. Miller, Jerome Dupont, Hyun Ho Lim, Kazuo Sato, Richard A. Altschuler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fos immunoreactive (IR) staining was used to examine changes in excitatory neuronal activity in the rat inferior colliculus (IC) between normal hearing and 21 day deaf rats evoked by basal or apical monopolar cochlear electrical stimulation. The location of evoked Fos IR neurons was consistent with expected tonotopic areas. The number of Fos IR cells increased as stimulation intensity increased in both normal and 21 day deaf animals. Stimulation at 1.5 X threshold evoked fewer Fos IR cells in 21 day deafened animals compared to normal hearing animals. At 5 X and above, however, significantly increased numbers of Fos IR neurons (in a larger grouping) were evoked in 21 day deafened animals compared to normal hearing animals. Another group of animals had 7 days of deafness followed by 14 days of chronic basal cochlear electrical stimulation. In this group basal monopolar stimulation at 5 X evoked not only a greater number of Fos IR neurons, compared to normal hearing animals, but the location of their grouping was slightly shifted to a more dorso-lateral region in the contralateral IC, compared to the normal hearing and 21 day deaf groups. These observations indicate that both deafness and chronic electrical stimulation may alter central auditory processing. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-250
Number of pages9
JournalHearing Research
Volume147
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2000

Keywords

  • Auditory brain stem
  • c-fos
  • Cochlear implant
  • Electrical stimulation
  • Inferior colliculus
  • Plasticity

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