Changes in waist circumference and body mass index in the US Cardia cohort: Fixed-effects associations with self-reported experiences of racial/ethnic discrimination

Timothy J. Cunningham, Lisa F. Berkman, Ichiro Kawachi, David R. Jacobs, Teresa E. Seeman, Catarina I. Kiefe, Steven L. Gortmaker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prior studies examining the association between self-reported experiences of racial/ethnic discrimination and obesity have had mixed results and primarily been cross-sectional. This study tests the hypothesis that an increase in self-reported experiences of racial/ethnic discrimination predicts gains in waist circumference and body mass index in Black and White women and men over eight years. In race/ethnicity- and gender-stratified models, this study examined whether change in self-reported experiences of racial/ethnic discrimination predicts changes in waist circumference and body mass index over time using a fixed-effects regression approach in SAS statistical software, providing control for both measured and unmeasured time-invariant covariates. Between 1992-93 and 2000-01, self-reported experiences of racial/ethnic discrimination decreased among 843 Black women (75% to 73%), 601 Black men (80% to 77%), 893 White women (30% to 23%) and 856 White men (28% to 23%). In fixed-effects regression models, controlling for all time-invariant covariates, social desirability bias, and changes in education and parity (women only) over time, an increase in self-reported experiences of racial/ethnic discrimination over time was significantly associated with an increase in waist circumference (β=1.09, 95% CI: 0.00-2.19, p=0.05) and an increase in body mass index (β=0.67, 95% CI: 0.19-1.16, p=0.007) among Black women. No associations were observed among Black men and White women and men. These findings suggest that an increase in self-reported experiences of racial/ethnic discrimination may be associated with increases in waist circumference and body mass index among Black women over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-278
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Biosocial Science
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Changes in waist circumference and body mass index in the US Cardia cohort: Fixed-effects associations with self-reported experiences of racial/ethnic discrimination'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this