Characterizing pathways by which gravitropic effectors could move from the root cap to the root of primary roots of Zea mays

R. Moore, C. E. Mcclelen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Plasmodesmata linking the root cap and root in primary roots Zea mays are restricted to approx. 400 protodermal cells bordering approx. 110000 μm2 of the calyptrogen of the root cap. This area is less than 10% of the cross-sectional area of the root-tip at the cap junction. Therefore, gravitropic effectors moving from the root cap to the root can move symplastically only through a relatively small area in the centre of the root. Decapped roots are non-responsive to gravity. However, decapped roots whose caps are replaced immediately after decapping are strongly graviresponsive. Thus, gravicurvature occurs only when the root cap contacts the root, and symplastic continuity between the cap and root is not required for gravicurvature. Completely removing mucilage from the root tip renders the root non-responsive to gravity. Taken together, these data suggest that gravitropic effectors move apoplastically through mucilage from the cap to the root.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)415-423
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Botany
Volume64
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1989

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research was supported by grants from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Research Incentive Program of Wright State University.

Keywords

  • Calyptrogen
  • Open meristem
  • Protoderm
  • Root cap
  • Root gravitropism
  • Zea mays

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