Chilling-induced photoinhibition in two oak species: Are evergreen leaves inherently better protected than deciduous leaves?

J. Cavender-Bares, S. Apostol, I. Moya, J. M. Briantais, F. A. Bazzaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

We compared the sensitivity to cold stress, in terms of photosynthetic capacity and changes in chlorophyll fluorescence of photosystem 2 (PS2), of an evergreen and a deciduous oak species, which co-occur in the southeastern United States. We predicted that the evergreen species, Quercus virginiana, which must endure winter, is likely to have an inherently greater capacity for energy dissipation and to be less susceptible to chilling stress than the deciduous species, Quercus michauxii. Short-term cold stress in both species lead to greater than 50% reduction in maximum photosynthetic rates, 60-70% reduction in electron transport, and irreversible quenching of PS2 fluorescence. The kinetics of recovery in the dark after exposure to 1 h high irradiance (1000 μmol m-2 s-1) and chilling (5 °C) showed that the evergreen Q. virginiana exhibited more protective q(E) and less irreversible quenching (q(I)) than the deciduous Q. michauxii. The large q(E) which we observed in Q. virginiana suggests that the capacity for photoprotection at low temperatures is not induced by a long-term acclimation to cold but preexists in evergreen leaves. This capacity may contribute to the ability of this species to maintain leaves during the winter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)587-596
Number of pages10
JournalPhotosynthetica
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2000

Keywords

  • Chlorophyll fluorescence
  • Evergreen and deciduous trees
  • Leaf habit
  • Nonphotochemical quenching
  • Photoprotection
  • Quercus michauxii
  • Quercus virginiana

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