Chronic stressors and daily hassles: Unique and interactive relationships with psychological distress

Joyce Serido, David M. Almeida, Elaine Wethington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

106 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using daily telephone interviews of a U.S. national sample of adults, aged 25-74 (N = 1,031), the present analyses draw from theories of the stress process and recent research to examine how chronic role-related stressors and daily hassles affect psychological distress. Four separate hypotheses are examined. The first explores the association between chronic stressors and daily hassles. The second tests whether daily hassles function as an intervening variable between chronic stressors and psychological distress. The third tests whether a chronic stressor moderates the relationship between daily hassles and psychological distress. The fourth hypothesis tests for cross-domain effects of chronic stressors and daily hassles. Findings indicate that chronic stressors and daily hassles are distinct types of stressors with unique contributions to psychological distress. The study provides support for chronic home stressors functioning as a moderating factor on the relationship between daily hassles and psychological distress both within and across domains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-33
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of health and social behavior
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004

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