Climate variability and health in extremely vulnerable communities: investigating variations in surface water conditions and food security in the West African Sahel

Kathryn Grace, Frank Davenport

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this project we consider the ways that different livelihood strategies impact the climate-health linkage. Specifically, we build on knowledge of livestock mobility in the Sahel and use remotely sensed-based measures of waterholes with health survey data to investigate the linkages between child health outcomes related to food security. We focus on the landscape characteristics relevant to limitedly studied, but highly climate-vulnerable populations, pastoralists and agro-pastoralists in the Sahel. We combine remotely sensed-based data on surface waterholes and spatially referenced health survey data and use flexible regression modeling techniques to uncover the quantitative relationship between waterhole depth and a child’s height-for-age z-score (HAZ). The results suggest that the water depth level of nearby waterholes does indeed impact a child’s HAZ, even after accounting for other environmental factors. This relationship is impacted, however, by the livelihood practices of the area as well as by the source of household drinking water.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPopulation and Environment
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V. part of Springer Nature.

Copyright:
Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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