Clinical Outcomes After Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty With and Without Subscapularis Repair: The Importance of Considering Glenosphere Lateralization

Brian C. Werner, Alexandra C. Wong, Gregory T. Mahony, Edward V. Craig, David M. Dines, Russell F. Warren, Lawrence V. Gulotta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Recent biomechanical data suggests that repairing the subscapularis during reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) can increase the force required by the posterior rotator cuff and deltoid to elevate the arm.

METHODS: We retrospectively studied patients who underwent primary RSA and had baseline and minimum 2-year postoperative American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) shoulder scores, stratified them according to subscapularis management, then subgrouped them according to lateralization of the glenosphere component.

RESULTS: Patients with subscapularis repair and a lateralized glenosphere had significantly less improvement in ASES scores than did those without lateralization (P = 0.016) and patients without subscapularis repair (P = 0.006). Individually, subscapularis management (P = 0.163) and glenosphere lateralization (P = 0.847) had no significant effect on the change in ASES score but in combination did have a significant effect on the change in ASES score (P = 0.002).

DISCUSSION: The combination of subscapularis repair and glenosphere implant lateralization in RSA translates to significantly less clinical improvement.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients who underwent both subscapularis repair and glenosphere lateralization had significantly less improvement in ASES scores.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e114-e119
JournalThe Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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