Comparison of larval fish detections using morphology-based taxonomy versus high-throughput sequencing for invasive species early detection

Joel Christopher Hoffman, Christy Meredith, Erik Pilgrim, Anett Trebitz, Chelsea Hatzenbuhler, John Russell Kelly, Gregory Peterson, Julie Lietz, Sara Okum, John Martinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

When first introduced, invasive species typically evade detection; DNA barcoding coupled with high-throughput sequencing (HTS) may be more sensitive and accurate than morphology-based taxonomy and thereby improve invasive (or rare) species detection. We quantified the relative error of species detection between morphology-based and HTS-based taxonomic identification of ichthyoplankton collections from the Port of Duluth, Minnesota, an aquatic non-native species introduction “hot-spot” in the Laurentian Great Lakes. We found HTS-based taxonomy identified 28 species and morphologybased taxonomy identified 30 species, of which 27 were common to both. Among samples, 76% of family-level taxonomic assignments agreed; however, only 42% of species assignments agreed. Most errors were attributed to morphology-based taxonomy, whereas HTS-based taxonomy error was low. For this study system, for most non-native fishes, the detection probability by randomized survey for larvae was similar to that by a survey that is optimized for non-native species early detection of juveniles and adults. We conclude that classifying taxonomic errors by comparing HTS results against morphology-based taxonomy is an important step toward incorporating HTS-based taxonomy into biodiversity surveys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)752-764
Number of pages13
JournalCanadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Volume78
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

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© 2021, Canadian Science Publishing. All rights reserved.

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