Comparison of low and moderate dosages of extended-release quetiapine in borderline personality disorder: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Donald W. Black, Mary C. Zanarini, Ann Romine, Martha Shaw, Jeff Allen, S. Charles Schulz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The authors compared the efficacy and tolerability of low and moderate dosages of extended-release quetiapine in adults with borderline personality disorder.

Method: Ninety-five participants with DSM-IV borderline personality disorder were randomly assigned to receive 150 mg/day of quetiapine (the low-dosage group; N=33), 300 mg/day of quetiapine (the moderatedosage group; N=33), or placebo (N=29). Total score over time on the clinician-rated Zanarini Rating Scale for Borderline Personality Disorder ("Zanarini scale")was analyzed in a mixed-effects model accounting for informative dropout.

Results: Participants in the low-dosage quetiapine group had significant improvement on the Zanarini scale compared with those in the placebo group. Time to response (defined as a reduction of 50% or more on the Zanarini scale total score) was significantly shorter for both the low-dosage quetiapine group (hazard ratio=2.54, p=0.007) and themoderate-dosage quetiapine group (hazard ratio=2.37, p=0.011) than for the placebo group. Among participants who completed the study, 82% in the lowdosage quetiapine group were rated as "responders," compared with 74% in the moderate-dosage group and 48% in the placebo group. Treatment-emergent adverse events included sedation, change in appetite, and dry mouth. The overall completion rate for the 8-week doubleblind treatment phase was 67% (67% for the low-dosage quetiapine group, 58% for the moderate-dosage quetiapine group, and 79% for the placebo group). Participants who experienced sedation were more likely to drop out.

Conclusions: Participants treated with 150 mg/day of quetiapine had a significant reduction in the severity of borderline personality disorder symptoms compared with those who received placebo. Adverse events were more likely in participants taking 300 mg/day of quetiapine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1174-1182
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume171
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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