Comparison of predicted cyclic resistance ratios from CPT, DMT, and shear wave velocity tests in Griffin, Indiana

D. A. Saftner, Y. Jung, R. D. Hryciw, R. A. Green

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper describes a site investigation performed at a sand and gravel quarry in Griffin, IN. Cone penetration tests (CPTu), vision CPTu (VisCPTu), seismic CPTu (SCPTu), and flat plate dilatometer tests (DMT) were performed. The high density and diversity of in situ tests provide an excellent opportunity to compare liquefaction susceptibility predictions using various tests. The availability of video image data offers a unique opportunity to augment the more conventional tests. The vision data provides a qualitative liquefaction hazard prediction, as very loose, liquefiable deposits show local liquefaction near the camera by way of observed soil movement during pauses in the cone's advance. Results show that current CPTu-based liquefaction assessments predict the highest liquefaction susceptibility in clean sand deposits. However, DMT-based liquefaction assessments predict the highest liquefaction susceptibility in gravelly sand.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGeo-Frontiers 2011
Subtitle of host publicationAdvances in Geotechnical Engineering - Proceedings of the Geo-Frontiers 2011 Conference
Pages2298-2307
Number of pages10
Edition211 GSP
DOIs
StatePublished - May 27 2011
EventGeo-Frontiers 2011: Advances in Geotechnical Engineering - Dallas, TX, United States
Duration: Mar 13 2011Mar 16 2011

Publication series

NameGeotechnical Special Publication
Number211 GSP
ISSN (Print)0895-0563

Other

OtherGeo-Frontiers 2011: Advances in Geotechnical Engineering
CountryUnited States
CityDallas, TX
Period3/13/113/16/11

Keywords

  • Gravel
  • Indiana
  • Sand (material)
  • Shear waves
  • Wave velocity

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