Comparison of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequences from the intracellular agents of proliferative enteritis in a hamster, deer, and ostrich with the sequence of a porcine isolate of Lawsonia intracellularis

Dale M. Cooper, Debra L. Swanson, Susan M. Barns, Connie J. Gebhart

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Abstract

Proliferative enteritis is an enteric disease that affects a variety of animals. The causative agent in swine has been determined to be an obligate intracellular bacterium, Lawsonia intracellularis, related to the sulfate- reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. The intracellular agents found in the lesions of different animal species are antigenically similar. In addition, strains from the pig, ferret, and hamster have been shown to be genetically similar. In this study we performed a partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis on the intracellular agent of proliferative enteritis from a hamster, a deer, and an ostrich and compared these sequences to that of the porcine L. intracellularis isolate. Results of this study indicate that the intracellular agents from these species with proliferative enteritis have high sequence similarity, indicating that they are all in the genus Lawsonia and that they may also be the same species, L. intracellularis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)635-639
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Systematic Bacteriology
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1997

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