Comparison of the Kid's Block Food Frequency Questionnaire to the 24-hour recall in urban Native American youth

Chery Smith, Stefanie Fila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study evaluated the appropriateness of the Kid's Block Food Frequency Questionnaire (Kid's Block FFQ) for use in a group of urban Native American youth by comparing it to a self-reported 24-hr recall. Subjects were 61 urban Native American youth, aged 9-13 years. Researchers assessed dietary intake using the two methods in random order on the same day. Analyses of diets revealed no significant difference between estimated total energy, protein, fat, and saturated fat between the two methods. Significant differences in estimations for the two tools occurred for carbohydrates and some micronutrients. Results suggest that the Kid's Block FFQ may be less appropriate than 24-hr recall in measuring the dietary intake of Native American youth. A high prevalence of obesity in this population necessitates more accurate dietary assessment tools for this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)706-709
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Biology
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

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