Consequences of high-stakes assessment for students with and without disabilities

Sandra L. Christenson, Dawn M. Decker, Heidi L. Triezenberg, James E. Ysseldyke, Amy Reschly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This descriptive study examined school professionals' perspectives of the effects of high-stakes assessment for students with and without disabilities. Participants were 249 general education teachers, special education teachers, and school psychologists from 99 schools across 19 states that have required high school exit exams. Participants completed a survey that examined their observations of the consequences of high-stakes assessment for students. Results suggested that school professionals perceived there to be a range in the effects of high-stakes assessment. Participants' responses indicated that a number of consequences have increased in frequency as a result of implementing high-stakes assessments. Many of the items that respondents indicated have increased were related to improving school and student performance. Less frequently, participants also indicated that some consequences have not changed in frequency or have decreased in frequency as a result of implementing high-stakes assessments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)662-690
Number of pages29
JournalEducational Policy
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

Keywords

  • Consequences
  • High-stakes assessment

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