Consequences of low neonatal iron status due to maternal diabetes mellitus on explicit memory performance in childhood

Tracy Riggins, Neely C. Miller, Patricia J. Bauer, Michael K. Georgieff, Charles A. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Diabetic pregnancies are characterized by chronic metabolic insults, including iron deficiency, that place the developing brain at risk for memory impairment later in life. A behavioral recall paradigm coupled with electrophysiological measures was used to assess the longevity of these effects in 40 3-year-old children. When memory demands were high, recall was significantly impaired in the at-risk group and correlated with perinatal measures of iron. Electrophysiological results suggested both encoding and retrieval processes were compromised. These findings support the hypothesis that prenatal iron deficiency leads to alterations in neural development that have a lasting impact on memory ability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)762-779
Number of pages18
JournalDevelopmental Neuropsychology
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Correspondence should be addressed to Tracy Riggins, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. E-mail: riggins@umd.edu This research was conducted at the Center for Neurobehavioral Development at the University of Minnesota and was supported by grants from NIH to Charles A. Nelson (NS34458) and Michael K. Georgieff (HD29421), a grant from the NICHD to Patricia J. Bauer (HD28425), and a grant from the NIH National Center for Research Resources (RR00400).

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