Contraceptive Method Use by Rural–Urban Residence among Women and Men in the United States, 2006 to 2017

Jaclyn A. Janis, Katherine A. Ahrens, Katy B. Kozhimannil, Erika C. Ziller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Policy and reproductive health practice changes in the past decade have affected use of different contraceptive methods, but no study has assessed contraceptive method use over this time by rural–urban residence in the United States. Methods: We used female and male respondent data (2006–2017) from the National Survey of Family Growth (n = 29,133 women and n = 24,364 men) to estimate contraceptive method use by rural–urban residence over time and contraceptive method use by age, marital status, and parity/number of children. Results: From 2006–2010 to 2013–2017, among urban women, we found increased use of two or more methods (11%–14%); increased use of intrauterine devices (5%–11%), implants (0–2%), and withdrawal (5–8%); and decreased use of sterilization (28%–22%) and pills (26%–22%). Among rural women, we found increased use of intrauterine devices (5%–9%) and implants (1%–5%). We found increased withdrawal use for urban men, but otherwise no differences among men across time. In data pooled across all survey periods (2006–2017), contraceptive method use varied by rural–urban residence across age, marital status, and parity/number of children. Conclusions: In a nationally representative sample of reproductive age women and men, we found rural–urban differences in contraceptive method use from 2006–2010 to 2013–2017. Describing contraceptive use differences by rural–urban residence is necessary for tailoring reproductive health services to populations appropriately.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWomen's Health Issues
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding Statement: K. A. A. is supported by a faculty development grant from the Maine Economic Improvement Fund. This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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