Contribution of dietary lipid change to falling serum cholesterol levels between 1980 to 1982 and 1985 to 1987 in an urban population The Minnesota heart survey

Karen L. Graves, Paul G. McGovern, J. Michael Sprafka, Aaron R. Folsom, Gregory L. Burke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

We assessed dietary intake and serum total cholesterol trends during the 1980s, in the Minneapolis-St. Paul (Twin Cities) metropolitan area. Twin Cities residents 25 to 74 years old participated in independent, cross-sectional, population-based surveys of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in 1980 to 1982 (n = 1611) and 1985 to 1987 (n = 2231). Age-adjusted total energy intake was similar in 1980 to 1982 and 1985 to 1987: 2528 kcal (10.6 MJ) versus 2574 kcal (10.8 MJ) for men and 1683 kcal (7.1 MJ) versus 1689 kcal (7.1 MJ) for women. However, significant changes were observed in macronutrient intake. The percent of energy from total fat intake decreased from 39.3 to 38.1 % in men and 38.9 to 36.6% in women (both P < 0.01). The composition of fat consumed changed, such that the Keys score, an index of dietary fat and cholesterol, decreased by 3.3 units in both sexes (both P < 0.01). The predicted changes in serum total cholesterol (Keys score) were generally consistent with observed declines of 5.4 mg/dL (0.1 mmol/L) in men and 5.8 mg/dL (0.15 mmol/L) in women during this time period. These data suggest that members of this community are on average modifying their fat consumption and that these dietary changes are resulting in more favorable serum total cholesterol levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)605-613
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of epidemiology
Volume3
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1993

Keywords

  • Diet
  • atherogenic diet
  • dietary fats
  • nutrition surveys
  • serum cholesterol

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