Converging on bladder health through design thinking: From an ecology of influence to a focused set of research questions

Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Lower urinary tract symptoms affect a substantial number of women in the United States (U.S.) and globally. In 2015, the Prevention of Lower Urinary tract Symptoms in women (PLUS) Research Consortium was funded to establish the scientific basis for prevention efforts by (1) understanding healthy bladder function and (2) identifying risk and protective factors for bladder health in women across the lifecourse. This transdisciplinary consortium generated a list of over 600 candidate risk and protective factors for bladder health in women and girls and refined and prioritized these into 29 focused research questions to inform a national longitudinal observational study in the U.S. This paper describes that process using design thinking, a human-centered set of principles and strategies by which innovations are developed, as a framework. Design thinking is an iterative process consisting of five stages: Empathizing with end-users of innovations, Defining core principles girding the work, Ideation of all possible solutions, and rapid-cycle Prototyping and Testing of solutions. Lessons learned are offered to inform future prevention science research endeavors that might benefit from such an approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number4340
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume17
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), grant numbers: U01DK106786, U01DK106853, U01DK106858, U01DK106898, U01DK106893, U01DK106827, U01DK106908, and U01DK106892; National Institute on Aging; NIH Office of Research on Women?s Health; and NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Acknowledgments: Participating research centers: Loyola University Chicago?2160 S. 1st Avenue, Maywood, IL 60153-3328 (Linda Brubaker, Multi-PI; Elizabeth R. Mueller, Multi-PI; Colleen M. Fitzgerald, Investigator; Cecilia T. Hardacker, Investigator; Jeni Hebert-Beirne, Investigator; Missy Lavender, Investigator; and David A. Shoham, Investigator); University of Alabama at Birmingham?1720 2nd Ave South, Birmingham, AL 35294 (Kathryn L. Burgio, PI; Tamera Coyne-Beasley, Investigator; Cora E. Lewis, Investigator; Alayne D. Markland, Investigator; Gerald McGwin, Investigator; Camille P. Vaughan, Investigator; and Beverly Williams, Investigator); University of California San Diego?9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0021 (Emily S. Lukacz, PI; Sheila Gahagan, Investigator; D. Yvette LaCoursiere, Investigator; and Jesse N. Nodora, Investigator); University of Michigan?500 S State Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (Janis M. Miller, PI; Lawrence Chin-I An, Investigator; and Lisa Kane Low, Investigator); University of Minnesota, Scientific and Data Coordinating Center (SDCC)?3 Morrill Hall, 100 Church St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (Bernard L. Harlow, Multi-PI; Kyle Rudser, Multi-PI; Sonya S. Brady, Investigator; John Connett, Investigator; Haitao Chu, Investigator; Cynthia S. Fok, Investigator; Todd Rockwood, Investigator; and Melissa Constantine, Investigator); University of Pennsylvania?Urology, 3rd FL West, Perelman Bldg, 34th & Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (Diane K. Newman PI; Amanda Berry, Investigator; C. Neill Epperson, Investigator; Heather Klusaritz, Investigator; Kathryn H. Schmitz, Investigator; Ariana L. Smith, Investigator; Ann E. Stapleton, Investigator; and Jean F. Wyman, Investigator); Washington University in St. Louis?One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (Siobhan Sutcliffe, PI; Aimee James, Investigator; Jerry Lowder, Investigator; and Melanie R. Meister, Investigator); Yale University?PO Box 208058 New Haven, CT 06520-8058 (Leslie Rickey, PI; Deepa Camenga, Investigator; Shayna D. Cunningham, Investigator; Toby Chai, Investigator; and Jessica B. Lewis, Investigator); Steering Committee Chair: Mary H. Palmer, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; NIH Program Office: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Division of Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases, Bethesda, MD (NIH Project Scientist: Tamara Bavendam).

Funding Information:
Funding: This work was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), grant numbers: U01DK106786, U01DK106853, U01DK106858, U01DK106898, U01DK106893, U01DK106827, U01DK106908, and U01DK106892; National Institute on Aging; NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health; and NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • Bladder health
  • Design thinking
  • Lower urinary tract symptom
  • Prevention
  • Public health
  • Research question development
  • Transdisciplinary
  • Women

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

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