Cooling of US Midwest summer temperature extremes from cropland intensification

Nathaniel D. Mueller, Ethan E. Butler, Karen A. Mckinnon, Andrew Rhines, Martin Tingley, N. Michele Holbrook, Peter Huybers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

96 Scopus citations

Abstract

High temperature extremes during the growing season can reduce agricultural production. At the same time, agricultural practices can modify temperatures by altering the surface energy budget. Here we identify centennial trends towards more favourable growing conditions in the US Midwest, including cooler summer temperature extremes and increased precipitation, and investigate the origins of these shifts. Statistically significant correspondence is found between the cooling pattern and trends in cropland intensification, as well as with trends towards greater irrigated land over a small subset of the domain. Land conversion to cropland, often considered an important influence on historical temperatures, is not significantly associated with cooling. We suggest that agricultural intensification increases the potential for evapotranspiration, leading to cooler temperatures and contributing to increased precipitation. The tendency for greater evapotranspiration on hotter days is consistent with our finding that cooling trends are greatest for the highest temperature percentiles. Temperatures over rainfed croplands show no cooling trend during drought conditions, consistent with evapotranspiration requiring adequate soil moisture, and implying that modern drought events feature greater warming as baseline cooler temperatures revert to historically high extremes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-322
Number of pages6
JournalNature Climate Change
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank F. Rockwell, T. Sinclair, L. Mickley, K. Harding, T. Twine, P. Snyder and C. O’Connell for helpful discussions. We thank N. Ramankutty for sharing the updated historical cropland data set. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (Hydrologic Sciences grant 1521210) and by a fellowship from the Harvard University Center for the Environment to N.D.M.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

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